Tuesday, April 9, 2019

Space, The Final Frontier

More artifacts today. A display case includes a device designed by Canadians and flown aboard Discovery. Canadian astronaut Roberta Bondar tested this space sled used for research on analyzing balance in space.


This panel and artifacts deal with the issue of radiation in space.


The second floor balcony allows for looks out over the entire Museum, as we'll see in the next two days as I close out this series. For the moment, we'll keep it space related with these views of the Canadarm.


This display case seen from above features a large scale photograph by Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques.


The astronauts in Canada's space program are featured together in the corridor looking out onto the collection. Some of them were in space more than once, and so each of their missions are covered. I got most of the set, though Saint-Jacques' profile hasn't been added to the set yet, as he's still up at the ISS, and I wasn't quite satisfied with a couple of my shots covering other missions, so I'm missing a couple of them.

37 comments:

  1. Catchy title, LLAP :-)
    In German btw it´s "das Weltall, unendliche Weiten" - "Space, endless vasteness". Stupid translation, no?

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  2. Very nice museum, packed with information and photos!

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  3. Canada's pioneers have come a long way from the fur-trappers of the Hudson Bay Co. A fascinating glimpse of technology that I don't understand!

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  4. Space is, indeed, the final frontier. I'm maybe even a little bit more interested in ocean exploration. Perhaps because space is so abstract for me.

    Janis
    GDP

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  5. ...perhap the deepest depths of the oceans will be next.

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  6. Roberta Bondar is such an inspiration. Then again, so are all of the Canadian astronauts.

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  7. You've done a good job working with displays and the reflected lights...which sometimes aren't even noticed until it's time to share the photos. Great to see the years of Canadians in space!

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  8. It's nice to learn about all the Canadian contributions to the space endeavor. I am enjoying this museum very much. :-)

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  9. Wonderful museum and exhibit. Thanks for sharing. Enjoy your day and week ahead!

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  10. @Lady Fi: that it is.

    @Iris: I figured this and the last post having Star Trek inspired post titles was appropriate.

    @Ella: there is a great deal to see in this place.

    @John: you wonder what the trappers would think.

    @Francisco: thank you.

    @Janis: it fascinates me.

    @Tom: yes, there's a lot we don't know about what's down there.

    @Marie: I agree.

    @Barbara: thanks!

    @DJan: I loved visiting.

    @Eileen: you're welcome.

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  11. Shows how ignorant I amcovery, I never even thought of Canada in being involved with space discovery. THANK yOU for all the nice comments you leave on my blog. Have a great week.

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  12. Great display, you photos bring home the amazing things the human mind can accomplish.

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  13. very cool. great history. the 80's was a great time. ( ;

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  14. I didn't realize that we had so many astronauts go into space. They were all very bright and talented people.

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  15. It takes a special combination of knowledge, bravery and curiosity to become an astronaut.

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  16. Very sophisticated post and photos about outer space ~

    Happy Days to you,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  17. @Likeschocolate: you're welcome.

    @Maywyn: quite true.

    @Beth: thank you.

    @Red: we've had quite a number.

    @Sharon: it really does, yes.

    @Karl: that it is.

    @Carol: thanks!

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  18. Good post, William.
    Very informative... as usual.

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  19. Space sled looks interesting!
    And I like the view from the balcony.

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  20. I feel like we are getting a guided tour of the whole museum.

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  21. Great interesting . I enjoy reading and seeing the pictures.

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  22. A wonderful exhibition, very informative and interesting.

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  23. I'm a fan of Chris Hadfield since he performed David Bowies 'Space Oddity' in the ISS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32d9R1ets2I

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  24. @Catarina: thanks!

    @Tamago: I do too.

    @RedPat: that's the idea!

    @Carol: thank you.

    @Bill: thanks!

    @Jan: Chris Hadfield made quite an impression out in space that last time!

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  25. William you have provided us with some excellent photographs and information, this is such a fascinating museum.
    Thank you for taking the time to do this …

    All the best Jan

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  26. One of the truly good things the International community is doing together.

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  27. You've covered so many museums -- I think Ottawa Visitors Bureau should pay you!

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  28. Such brave men and women in the space program! There are many aerospace engineers where I live as Lockheed Martin is nearby

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  29. You've got me wondering: I don't think the Smithsonian Museum shows all our U.S. astronauts as yours does. I remember seeing capsules, but not so much from current exploration. Yours seems very fresh and contemporary.

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  30. That's quite a gallery at the end.

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  31. @Jan: you're welcome.

    @Revrunner: quite true.

    @Jeanie: I sometimes think so too!

    @Pat: it is something of a calling.

    @Kay: of course there are many more American astronauts down through time.

    @Anvilcloud: yes, and a good idea.

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  32. I say again William, such brave men and women ✨

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  33. SO COOL!! and look there's Chris Hadfield!

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  34. Fascinating people and museum.

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