Saturday, January 3, 2015

All That Remains Of A Winter Festival

In the aftermath of Winterlude in February, I passed through Confederation Park and took these two shots, but never published them. Perhaps because after all those beautiful sculptures, it seemed sad to see what became of them all. Due to liability issues (in this day and age we can't have someone hurt themselves or worse because of mishaps involving a melting sculpture, after all- there are far too many lawyers in the world pursuing far too many lawsuits... which reminds me, Shakespeare had it right: the first thing we do is kill all the lawyers), the sculptures are all broken down into these blocks, which are soon removed from the park. The colour you see in some of the blocks are from some interactive sculptures that had the work of children applying something along the lines of food colouring to them.




43 comments:

  1. Oh yes, this is a bit sad. All those gorgeous sculptures in pile of rubble.

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  2. You've done a photograph of sadness. Before were all of happiness now ... touch to sadness.

    Tomás.

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  3. Looking forward to a new edition of the Winter Festival, I suppose..

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  4. That looks sad to watch the remains this way.

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  5. Am I right in thinking that is light snow for your part of the world at this time of the year?

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  6. The mess of broken ice sculptures looks more dangerous to one who might try to walk through it don't you think? :) It would be painful to trip and fall on that mess! Enjoy the weekend.

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  7. @Sharon: well it has to be done.

    @Whisk: I figured that would be the reaction.

    @Tomas: indeed.

    @Marleen: it won't be long now!

    @Karl: unfortunately so.

    @Denise: yes, I wondered how people would have felt if I'd posted it immediately afterwards.

    @Marianne: even all these months later.

    @Revrunner: as it must.

    @Mo: it just looks that way, but there was a good amount of snow around. The bushes in the foreground are pretty much covered in it.

    @Pamela: well it's not possible to get at it from behind, and it was cordoned off from the front.

    @Anna: definitely.

    @Hilary: that seems to be the consensus.

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  8. A quite sad story for a couple of nice photos...

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  9. Er, this is Canada. We spend five months of the year surrounded by snow and ice..it even melts in the spring. The government allows us to live in such dangerous conditions? We should sue!
    Jane x

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  10. We often do ice sculptures here, too. I never thought they'd ruin them there. Then, in the days of Waterlude, they'd melt anyway! Interesting. I miss much not going downtown these days!

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  11. snow is magic, innocence and peace. I love the mountains and the snow and the peace that radiates!

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  12. wow. all those hours of work and precision reduced to quick rubble!

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  13. Well, thats the way things go, I think ... All and everytihing is passing in time.

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  14. Intriguing at first sight. Glad you have explained it.

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  15. Snow festivals with sculptures and all. Kind of depressing after rain and sun make their mark.

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  16. Interesting. Seems strange after all the work that goes into them. I guess people don't take responsibility for their own actions anymore.

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  17. I thought those sculptures never melt up in your stratosphere. Lol

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  18. Ah, the graveyard of ice sculptures!

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  19. @VP: isn't it odd that all these months later we're mourning ice sculptures?

    @Jane and Chris: but winter is good for us!

    @Jennifer: I can understand the legal reasons for breaking them down when it's all said and done.

    @Filonico: thank you.

    @Tex: very quickly, too.

    @Jan: that's true.

    @Jose: I almost neglected to add in the text before I left last night. It was scheduled to go, so I would have come in this morning to confused remarks.

    @Birdman: In the past they weren't sheltered, so sometimes these sculptures could come apart during the festival.

    @Judy: they really don't.

    @Eve: eventually they do.

    @Cheryl: I could have titled it that!

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  20. Yes I can imagine lawyers rubbing their hands in glee at the prospect! Bit sad to see the sculptures end up this way William.

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  21. It's sad that people can not protect themselves. It's going to get worse as parents micro manage these days and the little beaners never learn to look after themselves.

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  22. This picture is quite poignant! So much creative energy knocked down and snowed under!

    What do you call 10,000 lawyers at the bottom of the sea? Good riddance.

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  23. That's what becomes of the sculptures after Winterlude?

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  24. The season has a way of destroying them slowly, anyway. But yeah, the sculpture graveyard does tug at the heartstrings.

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  25. At least you have recorded their existence for posterity

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  26. @Grace: lawyers rub their hands together far too often!

    @Red: that's true!

    @Lowell: and a good start!

    @Norma: yes, I know, it's sad.

    @RedPat: it certainly is.

    @Hilary: left to their own devices, they'd melt, or a strong wind would break pieces of sculptures off.

    @Gerald: that's true.

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  27. Heaven forbid some one could get hurt.

    I like your several favorite post of last year. It is so hard to choose so I just conveniently forgot.

    MB

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  28. It takes so much time and effort to build something, but it's quick and easy to destroy it. At least those sculptures are fully enjoyed while they were alive :-) Though, the scene does bring sad feeling naturally.

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  29. Yeah. God forbid anyone be held responsible for their own stupidity.

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  30. Everything has an end, sadly.

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  31. Kind of a sad sight... site... hmm, could be either one.

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  32. Ouch. I'm probably dead now then, even though I couldn't agree more with you and Shakespeare.

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  33. Oh thats so sad. Melting down would be natural but breaking down is heartbreaking.

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  34. Sad but expected, I suppose.
    I keep forgetting to tell you that I love your fantastic header photo!

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