Thursday, January 22, 2015

Hogamanay

On New Year's Eve, when I was still under the effects of painkillers and dealing with a sore leg, I went with friends to the Aberdeen Pavilion at Lansdowne Park, where a traditional Scottish New Year's Eve was taking place. Hogamanay is the Scottish word for the last day of the year, and the evening was filled with music, drink, and Scottish cooking. In a bit of a rush (and a bit of a daze), I photographed a highland bagpipe and drum band in mid-march through the pavilion.


Another take on this event tomorrow. I might need witness protection after it gets posted.

35 comments:

  1. Well, that's suitably whetted appetites! You realise what a big build-up can do? And are you ready for Burns Night? Hope your leg's OK!

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  2. How is now your leg ? cured, I think ¿no?

    Tomás.

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  3. I always like to hear the pipe music!

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  4. Pain killers, eh? Sore leg. Bagpipe music. Ouch!

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  5. It's a nice picture, especially considering the conditions under which you were operating. Bagpipes I cannot abide, however. Whoever came up with those ear-piercing screeches out to be ... well, bagpiped!

    Now, I can't wait to see what you're gonna post tomorrow!

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  6. Funny music an funny event, he?
    Today I've learned a new word: Hogamanay.

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  7. Witness protection huh? That sounds intriguing. Also, LOVE bagpipes. Also Hogamanay is a fun word to say.

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  8. Yep, I think you might! It's been nice knowing you!

    Hogamanay...I thought this was going to be about pigs....

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  9. @Mike: yes, the leg's fine now. And Burns night is right around the corner!

    @Tomas: oh yes, no problem at all now.

    @Marianne: I'm one of those who likes it too.

    @Revrunner: ah, it reminds you of walking over the highland hills and hearing the pipes and picking a fight with the English!

    @Lowell: let's just say it's more what I have to say that might get me in trouble with a Scottie!

    @Karl: and it's a good word!

    @Aimee: it really is!

    @Norma: the Scots know how to celebrate New Years!

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  10. Love a Scottish Hogmanay and believe me as a Scot I've been to many :) J'adore the bagpipes so I hope you're not going to rubbish them tomorrow William :) or does it have something to do with what they do or don't wear under their kilts :)

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  11. I'm very curious about tomorrow's post now!

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  12. Oh, I can hardly wait to see a photo that might need witness protection. :))

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  13. That looks fun! I wonder what you captured in your camera, that might need witness protection. Can't wait to see it!

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  14. I will be waiting to see what your next post reveals!

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  15. These guys know how to celebrate! We don't have enough Scots here to have a hogamanay.

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  16. It's a good thing to be on pain killers if you're going to listen to bagpipes.

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  17. @Grace: I do like the pipes!

    @Pamela: some don't, but their sound feels very good to me.

    @Halcyon: if need be, I'll pin the blame on my idiot ex-brother-in-law.

    @Anna: the music certainly filled that space.

    @Sharon: it was, while I was there.

    @EG: ah, it's more in the writing!

    @Tamago: nothing along the lines of a kilt malfunction. At least that I noticed.

    @Judy: now I'm finding myself wishing it had been a kilt malfunction. Did I just coin a new term?

    @Red: there's a large Scottish population in the Ottawa Valley.

    @Stuart: hah!

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  18. Ooh! Bagpipes! A shame the painkillers probably numbed the experience!

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  19. how funny. blame it on some irish whiskey. :)

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  20. So I guess a lot of Scottish people live in Ottawa?

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  21. Good catch. Looking forward to tomorrow! ;-)

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  22. When we first came to Canada from Ireland my parents mainly mixed with English, Irish and Scottish folks so Hogamanay was a common tradition in our house. My father had the darkest hair so he would do the "first-footing".

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  23. Yep, I'm ready to see tomorrow's offering. Don't forget that lots goes on New Years Eve that might be well, best forgotten...

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  24. @VP: thank you!

    @Cheryl: there's the joke about the Scotsman going to university and practicing his bagpipes, but he can't do so in his own dorm room, because the whole time there's banging and wailing from either side of his room.

    @Tex: that would be a good excuse too!

    @Marleen: yes, there are strong Scottish and Irish communities here.

    @RedPat: thanks!

    @Jackie: I'd love to spend a New Year's in Scotland. I hear the party routinely puts other New Year's parties to shame.

    @Kay: that's true!

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  25. Looks like a good way to spend New Years (except for the pain!).

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  26. You mean the bagpipes and drums didn't cut through the fog of the painkillers and booze? I would have loved hearing the bagpipes.

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  27. i am curious about tomorrow??! i have always enjoyed bagpipes ... they are in my heritage... maybe that is why??! but they do make me cry ... i am such a sentimental person times. ( :

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  28. Ha... I'm intrigued about the next post.

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