Thursday, January 23, 2014

Wildlife

Moving out of human history for a moment, and into biodiversity. The ROM features displays of animals from around the world through this section. This rhino posed something of a challenge in terms of framing a photograph.


As did this bison, a native of the North American plains.


Capturing an image through glass, of course, can be a nuisance, but I like the stance of this leopard.


In this nearby area, the glass is removed. This part of the museum offers a more up close experience for kids, touching things, with staff on hand. This raccoon and beaver are placed side by side here.


While this wolf, not behind glass, is still close enough to the passerby to appreciate. I have heard the howl of wolves on a number of occasions, and it's pure magic. I have even had the good fortune to see them from time to time, including sharing a clifftop with a wolf in Algonquin Park several years ago. That's the kind of experience you never forget.



25 comments:

  1. There are so many raccoons in TO, I'm surprised they felt a need to put one in the museum!

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  2. I have mixed feelings about this considering that man has hunted some of them to the brink of extinction...

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  3. Some day you must tell that clifftop story !

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  4. William, thank you for commenting on my blog I do appreciate it, I am now a follower of your blog. It's been many years since we had a trip to the ROM; I do think another trip is in order soon and your photos have reminded me why.

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  5. Jane: There are also many wolves, well possibly coywolves, roaming the streets of Toronto. I have memorable moments of being in Algonquin Park but none related to a wolf. My most vivid memory of a wolf is crossing paths with one whille running through Mount Pleasant Cemetery (Toronto) on a cold winter morning.

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  6. That would have been unforgettable William.. I'll never forget the first time I heard a lion roar.. Unbelievable! Really interesting series of posts about the museum.. Enjoyed!

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  7. Oh the howl of wolves, how otherworldy! I can only imagine. The beaver and raccoon could be from around these parts, though I could never capture them properly on camera:) Love these nature sections of any museum.

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  8. I can see that the museum has quite a collection of animals.

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  9. @Hamilton: there's no shortage of them in a city when you know where to look!

    @Ciel: I suspect that a good part of the collection here was already present in the earliest years of the museum.

    @Stuart: I was sitting on a clifftop on my favourite trail, Centennial Ridges, looking out at a lake down below. I saw movement out of the corner of my eye, and there he was, further down the cliff. He saw me, decided I wasn't a problem, and he looked out over the water for a few moments before heading back into the brush. I've always liked to think he came for the view, and liked the location as much as I did.

    @Gill: it had been too long since I'd been in there.

    @Jane: well, those ones in Toronto are coyotes. The wolves of Algonquin are a remnant population of Eastern Red Wolves, and timber wolves are further north and bigger than the Algonquin wolves.

    @Grace: thank you!

    @LondonLulu: I've seen beavers in the wild, but it's hard to catch them on camera. And raccoons tend to be quite elusive when you pass near them in the city...

    @Sharon: it surely does.

    @Tanya: they're remarkable animals!

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  10. I've been planning a similar post. The Smithsonian Natural History museum here has a great mammals exhibit. Great pics! That wolf looks amazing. How great it would be to see one in the wild.

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  11. Your photos are good, but I think is much better to collect and watch all the animals in the Zoo. Who would be killed and used as exhibit?

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  12. I feel sort of sorry for those animals. :(

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  13. Rhinos are rather huge aren't they. Excellent pics. I could spend hours or days just looking , looking, looking.
    Waiting 'til tomorrow. MB

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  14. Don't much like stuffed animals. Don't much like wild animals either! Especially if I'm out in the open with them!

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  15. Actually there was a news report this week about coywolves being seen downtown in Toronto in the ravines along the Don. They are a bit bigger than coyotes.
    Looking into the eyes of a wolf is something you never forget!

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  16. Jane: http://www.cbc.ca/natureofthings/episodes/meet-the-coywolf

    Very interesting!

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  17. @Krisztina: they've got a similar display here in our Museum of Nature.

    @Inna: I'd prefer to see them in the wild myself.

    @Halcyon: I'd like to think we've progressed beyond that, but when you hear of people buying the right to shoot an endangered animal....

    @MB: I would love to see a rhino in Africa.

    @Cheryl: so we can't talk you into a safari?

    @RedPat: I stand corrected! I looked around earlier, and sure enough, coywolves. They're not related to the Algonquin wolves, though.

    @Jane: I'll get into that episode.

    @Norma: thank you!

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  18. This looks to be an amazing museum! Your photos are great as usual!

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  19. It's always a challenge to get photos of glass enclosed exhibits in a museum and trying to fit some i to a frame is even harder. Then there are the reflections to contend with as well.

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  20. When I was a child we'd go to the Museum of Natural History and gape at things like that. It was in Washington, DC and we lived about 20 miles away.

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  21. Now that's one way to get some wild life photography lol I would love to capture these kinds of animals in their natural habitat . Thanks for sharing . Have a good weekend !

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  22. A really interesting museum!

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  23. Amazing, I like especially the bison :-)

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