Monday, October 4, 2021

A Meeting Of Two Cultural Worlds

Starting where I left off yesterday. A video display features an indigenous elder speaking about the ways of old. This particular elder is featured on video elsewhere in the galleries.


Across is a display case with various artifacts. The red sash stands out the most of these. It is emblematic of the attire of the voyageur, the French-Canadian fur trader who went deep into the continent, ahead of settlers, and established relationships with the indigenous peoples, often of mutual gain.


Those relationships often involved marriages and the establishments of a blended family. 


Out of these blended families would come a distinctive indigenous culture of its own, the Metis.

30 comments:

  1. Positive moves in the early days are good to hear about instead of exploitation. Its now 3.45pm on a holiday Monday my time.

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  2. Interesting how humans blend into new groups...

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  3. The birth of the metis nation, is interesting. Blended families are everywhere now.
    Take care, enjoy your day! Have a great new week!

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  4. The keg is interesting. Trapping is gruesome.

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  5. Voyageurs don't get enough recognition for the critical role they played in opening up the continent,

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  6. How they had time for art those days...

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  7. This part of the Canadian history is new for me.

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  8. @Julia: it was common of the trader to join the culture around him.

    @Italiafinlandia: that it is.

    @Francisco: thank you.

    @Eileen: it is quite a story.

    @Maywyn: true, but part of the tale.

    @David: they pushed deep into things.

    @Iris: rarely!

    @Jan: more to come.

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  9. ...I don't think that things worked well here.

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  10. I've never been really sure about how the Metis started. We never learned that in school.

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  11. Our pre settlement history is very interesting . It was also a very long period of time.

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  12. Those traders were a brave bunch.

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  13. The red sash is interesting and I like how it is displayed.

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  14. very cool. love the details. sorry for the late comment, been traveling. camping out. back now. life - well i gotta play catch up. take care. ( ;

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  15. Never knew of the Metish, interesting history. Thanks for sharing, William.

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  16. The Voyager history is fascinating.

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  17. Another wonderful exhibit ~ and photos ~ always fascinating history ~

    Living in the moment,

    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  18. @Tom: no, but one must try.

    @RedPat: it was a gradual development over decades before they had a sense of themselves as a unique culture.

    @Red: that it was.

    @Sharon: out in a strange new world.

    @Jeanie: the sash is distinctive.

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  19. @Beth: thank you.

    @Bill: you're welcome.

    @Marie: that it is.

    @Carol: thank you.

    @Marleen: indeed.

    @Gemel: thanks.

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  20. Interesting history about the Metish. I didn't know about them.

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    Replies
    1. They're more commonly known here. I have a friend who's Metis on his mother's side. Enough so that he qualifies.

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  21. I did not know of the achievements of the Metis nation, only that they were identified separately.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, they and the Inuit are deemed separate entities from those collectively called First Nations.

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  22. There is much history to learn.

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  23. I find those sashes really lovely. And the museums -- so beautifully designed.

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  24. I always enjoy your museum trips!

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