Thursday, October 7, 2021

The Museum Sanctuary

 This is one of the treasures of the Museum. St. Onuphrius is a consecrated Ukrainian Catholic Church, completed in 1915 in the Alberta countryside, and given to the Museum in the 90s. Still consecrated, it is still occasionally used for services. Its small sanctuary is presently cordoned off due to Covid restrictions, but the front doors are open and a view inside is possible. Going around the church as one views panels and artifacts around it gives the visitor a chance to look inside as well.


Settlers in the West during the late 19th and early 20th centuries adapted to the new land. Here we have some farming tools, and the coat of a woman, a Ukrainian immigrant who settled in Alberta.


Schools in rural areas were often one room schoolhouses with multiple grades learning together. Artifacts include a desk, lunch pail, and student's bag of the period.


A look through the back door of the church takes in the sacristy.


To leave off today, two views from behind the screen in the church.

36 comments:

  1. I really like looking into old buildings, even a glimpse is enough to imagine how it was.

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  2. It is a beautiful church and is well maintained and preserved.

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  3. Very interesting. I always love a glimpse into this part of time.

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  4. I like the way you can peer through the window panes into the past:)

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  5. What a lovely little building.

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  6. Hello,
    It is a cute little church, great tour.
    Take care, enjoy your day!

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  7. It's a long way from the Alberta prairie.....

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  8. @Amy: this one certainly accomplishes that.

    @Nancy: it is well looked after.

    @Iris: me too.

    @Rosie: so do I.

    @Francisco: thanks.

    @Rosemary: I agree.

    @David: that it is.

    @Gemel: indeed.

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  9. I would love to visit this church.
    I like the header.

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  10. ...it's wonderful that it has been preserved.

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  11. I don't remember that. Of course, I don't remember much. :)

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  12. Love that church in that location. So unusual!

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  13. It is such a lovely little church!

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  14. @Catarina: thank you.

    @Tom: definitely.

    @Jan: I agree.

    @Anvilcloud: hah!

    @DJan: thank you.

    @Marie: it is, yes.

    @RedPat: indeed.

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  15. I went to one of those one room schools called Hiawatha. My first year teaching was in one of those country schools...Louisville.

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  16. I remember that little church from your past posts. It is such a little treasure.

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  17. Are you sure that this is a catholic church ? The cross in and on the church is orthodox, the catholics have Jesus Christ hanging on the cross inside the church usually nothing on the top. It doesn't look like a catholic church, I have seen a orthodox church in Egypt and it looked exactly like yours !

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  18. I love how the museum has located the church in a setting which gives it a good lighting and lets you see into all areas of it. I have a Ukrainian doctor (well, his name is Ukrainian,) and wonder if his ancestors would have worshipped in a similar church. The immigrants would have copied a style from the old country!

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  19. The little church is beautiful.

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  20. @Red: I take it that's the inspiration for your blog title?

    @Sharon: it certainly is.

    @Gattina: Catholic is what it's called. I think the Ukrainian influence is what really makes it feel more like an Orthodox church.

    @Barbara: they would have.

    @Bill: it certainly is.

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  21. What a beautiful sanctuary! Tweeted.

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  22. Hadn’t seen your headed. It is so pretty.

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  23. Frontier life is hard, but a sweet post nevertheless.

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  24. I do like your first and second photograph here, and your header photograph is beautiful.

    All the best Jan

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  25. It’ wonderful to have a look in that little church.

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  26. Beautiful sanctuary ~ glad it was preserved ~

    Wonderful seasonal photo and haiku ~ Xo

    Living in the moment,

    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  27. This is indeed a little gem. I'm so glad this is there, protected and still so very beautiful. Interesting that it is still open for certain occasions.

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  28. Cool that this place originated here in Alberta, there are still so many Ukrainian churches here, in varying stages of totally decaying to still in use. They are some of my favourite churches to find when backroad exploring!

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