Tuesday, August 3, 2021

Great Courage, Chance Encounter

Carrying on where I left off with this exhibit on the Second World War, here we have a look at George Boyer, who served in the Canadian Navy through much of the war.


Here is his medal set.


Something else I found affecting, an artifact from a Londoner during the time of the Blitz.


Dunkirk is also examined. Canadian infantry were stationed in Britain at the time of the evacuation.


But Canadians were involved in what's been called the Miracle of Dunkirk. Here we have one of them.


Here we have a story of Gwendoline Green, an English war bride who met a Canadian airman. 


This is the suit she wore on their wedding day.


To close off today, a look ahead.

28 comments:

  1. Scary pic of the soldiers kneeling.

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  2. The Dunkirk evacuation was one of the true miracles of WW2 with so many heroic feats. The quilt is a very interesting piece of social history.

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  3. On yes I've read and heard the history of Dunkirk, lots of brave men and women involved in that one.

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  4. ...there were a number of English war brides!

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  5. The suit is so feminine. So many interesting artifacts your musem

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  6. Being married to an ardent quilter, I can see how quilting could sooth the nerves in times of stress.

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  7. I especially enjoyed meeting Gwendoline. So often the women’s stories are missed.

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  8. @Iris: it was a time of that. Kneel, but be ready.

    @fun60: and those evacuated men would come back to the continent again.

    @Amy: Dunkirk was a miracle.

    @Tom: there were many.

    @Gemel: it has a considerable collection.

    @David: not surprising.

    @Marie: very often.

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  9. The stories of the women are good to hear.
    I'm still around. http://occasionaltoronto.blogspot.com/

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  10. Another wonderful post! True life stories are the best.

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  11. I specially like the quilt and the story behind it.

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  12. Robert Benny, se ve bastante joven. Es lo que se encontró la juventud de esa época. Había que luchar y si era necesario perder la vida.

    En algunos países además de las novias, estaban las madrinas de guerra, para darle cariño a los jóvenes y que tuvieran consuelo.

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  13. @Magiceye: thank you.

    @RedPat: definitely.

    @Denise: indeed.

    @Jan: as do I.

    @Sharon: it is.

    @Ventana: thanks.

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  14. very cool quilt. my great aunt was in WW2. i often wonder how many folks she saw, or meet. she was a Army nurse. lost a lung due to TB, but helped so many men in their recovery. we have many of her pics and i enjoy hearing this or that about what she went through. ( :

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  15. Interesting to go back and remember those times again. Dunkirk was a miracle wrought by ordinary people. I like the wedding dress, too.

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  16. I think I'd really like this museum -- you're giving us a wonderful taste of it.

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  17. An impressive exhibit. What brave men and women from that era! I enjoyed watching the movie Dunkirk and learning more about that battle.

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  18. Just read where a member of the family that resided at Croom Court estate in England died at Dunkirk.

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  19. @Beth: many served.

    @DJan: thank you.

    @Jeanie: it's a splendid museum.

    @Pat: it was an extraordinary moment.

    @Revrunner: not a surprise.

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  20. Very interesting to see the wedding day suit.

    All the best Jan

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  21. Do you read a lot about the wars? My husband does!

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  22. I believe my mom would have pieced a quilt had she been faced with bomb shelters.

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  23. Enjoyed the stories and that dress! Quite interesting tribute to them all, thanks.

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  24. So much emotion sewn into that quilt:)

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  25. Bravery personified and grateful for those who fought the war ~

    Living in the moment,

    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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