Thursday, August 5, 2021

Murmansk Run, V For Victory

A note to readers in the area: the Queens of Egypt exhibit at the Museum of History is well worth taking in. It wraps up on August 22nd, so book tickets as soon as you can. For the rest of you, I paid a visit yesterday and thoroughly enjoyed it. Photos to come down the line.

Keith Jones was seventeen when he enlisted in the Naval Reserves. He would serve with distinction, survive the war, and the memories would stay with him.


A couple of his journals are displayed here, along with a medal, received from the Soviets for participating in the Murmansk Run.


Another bit of military hardware, a rocket launcher.


This I found fascinating: a German pilot shot down in France and was captured. This was his life vest, signed by RCAF servicemen.


A profile of a Canadian officer who would serve with distinction in the Italian campaign and meet his end there: Alexander Campbell.


This caught my eye.

26 comments:

  1. And now I know a Morse code.
    I´d rather use it in sports, though.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Interesting exhibit! Take care, enjoy your day!

    ReplyDelete
  3. ...the rocket launcher looks like a giant box of exploding crayons!

    ReplyDelete
  4. This past winter, I wrote the story of the war experience of the grandfather of a family friend. He went overseas in December 1940 in one of the Atlantic convoys just after the crossing which sank 17 ships. I read some accounts of the convoys and the Battle of the Atlantic. Harrowing experience and it was only the beginning.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Oh my gosh William, I've just been back to read last two posts, an exhibition like this, detailing individuals, makes the war and those who died in action even more real ✨

    ReplyDelete
  6. V for Victory (...-) was the recognition tune of Radio Netherlands from London during the war.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I hope you share the Queens of Egypt exhibit. What a great museum.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I loved all those signatures on the life vest!

    ReplyDelete
  9. The victory flag is so unusual!

    ReplyDelete
  10. @Iris: the museum actually has morse code on its exterior.

    @Eileen: thank you.

    @Francisco: thanks.

    @Tom: it does.

    @Marie: quite so.

    @Grace: it does.

    @Jennifer: you're welcome.

    @Jan: not a surprise.

    @Jeanie: I will.

    @Barbara: me too.

    @RedPat: it is.

    ReplyDelete
  11. WW II history is fading so these exhibits are all the more important.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Good thing Keith survived to tell the story. Sad about Campbell though.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Se alistaban siendo unos adolescentes y la guerra los transformó en unos hombres con coraje y valor.

    Buen recuerdos para esos hombres, que sacrificaron su vida por unos ideales que supieron defender.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Such an interesting exhibit.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Thank you. The written descriptions were fascinating.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I am so happy to see these reminders of the people who served to keep us safe.
    Unfortunately in Tucson the hero's are the cartels that make money and kill people. No heroes here today. Teaching America History is not even important. Ethnic studies is more important in High School.

    ReplyDelete
  17. i always enjoy seeing uniforms. ( ;

    ReplyDelete