Friday, January 14, 2022

Italian Campaign

Alongside British, American, and other Allies, Canadian forces took part in the invasion of Sicily and the subsequent invasion of the Italian mainland, starting on July 10th, 1943.


Entry Into Assoro, Sicily is the title of this painting by William Ogilvie.


Some of what the Allies were facing are seen displayed here.


The Battle of Ortona was a vicious one fought in December 1943, fought in the coastal town between German troops and Canadian soldiers in close quarters, street to street and home to home.


This painting, by Charles Comfort, is titled Casa Berardi.


A reproduction you can walk through features life sized mannequins, outfitted in the uniform of the time, on either side of a wall. This is a Canadian soldier.


And on the other side, a German soldier.


Another Comfort painting: this is Canadian Armour Passing Through Ortona.


As the Allies drove north through Italy and the Italians surrendered, the Germans continued to put up a stiff resistance. Over time they were pushed back: the Hitler Line, the Gothic Line. Canadians were part of that campaign throughout.


Here we have a trophy of war: a German Stug III, part of their defenses at the Gothic Line.

32 comments:

  1. Oh, my goodness, I think I would freak out seeing such a mannequin.
    Like the soldier, weapon in both hands, I saw in Mexico.
    Sturmgesch├╝tz, ha. The storm came into their direction after all (but most were jsut men who were forced to fight, other their families were in danger).

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  2. Wow great pictures!
    Good you share this kind of stuff:))

    Happy weekend!

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  3. My father was part of the invasion force that retook Italy. He took me on a tour of the places where he had been during that time.

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  4. Hello,
    What a great exhibit, the mannequins look real and are scary.
    Take care, enjoy your day! Have a happy weekend!

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  5. ...the war had so many fronts!

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  6. The paintings and reproduction mannequins look real.

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  7. The life size mannequins put things in perspective!

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  8. The life size ones are a bit scary! There is much to learn about the past.

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  9. Interesting piece again. And meanwhile, on the eastern side of Europe, we may be on the brink of a new war. It never seems to stop.

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  10. I like how they incorporate the paintings into the overall exhibits. It's very effective and adds a splash of color.

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  11. @Iris: many Germans were hostages in the grip of that terrible little man and his ideology.

    @Anita: thank you.

    @Francisco: thanks.

    @Revrunner: a memorable journey.

    @Eileen: thanks.

    @Tom: it did.

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  12. @Sharon: the museum has a lot of war art.

    @Nancy: they make you look twice.

    @Marie: they do indeed.

    @Jennifer: I agree.

    @Jan: so it seems.

    @Jeanie: I think so too.

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  13. The life size display is a bit scary.

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  14. the Germans didn't get much help from the Italians.

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  15. William - I bet the walk through with the life-sized mannequins was quite impactful.

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  16. The mannequins look so real and give the display life.

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  17. Another great war perspecTive ~

    Wishing you happy moments,

    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  18. @RedPat: they do make an effective display.

    @Red: no, the Italians gave up pretty quick.

    @Angie: yes it is.

    @Bill: very much so.

    @Carol: thank you.

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  19. I always enjoy your views and information. Excellent post.

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  20. The paintings are very realistic.

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  21. Marvelous captures the statues especially the German soldier so realistic. Interesting. Thanks.

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  22. Very detailed and graphic images in these displays:)

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  23. It's good when museums use mannequins to show the events back then.

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